Baylor Scott & White Medical Center Grapevine

YEAR COMPLETED:
2013


Project Size:
174,837 SF
73,600 SF renovation


Owner:
Baylor Scott & White


ARCHITECTURAL FIRM:
HDR


CONSTRUCTOR:
MEDCO Construction


Geisler Pender Personnel Provided Services:
Civil Engineering
Survey
Strengthening Engineering
Structural Engineering

Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Grapevine is a full-service, fully-accredited not-for-profit hospital serving residents in more than 20 cities throughout the Dallas/Fort Worth region. The 276-bed hospital offers advanced medical services for cardiovascular services, women’s services, oncology, neurology, spine care, orthopedics, diagnostic imaging, neonatal intensive care, intensive and emergency care.


In 2012, While with RLG, Mrs. Giesler with the structural team provided services for a multi-faceted project that included the demolition of the existing entry, addition of a new 4-story bed tower, and renovation of a portion of the existing hospital. Due to the timeline of construction, the project was issued in 4 packages.


Phase 1: RLG Structural provided extents for demolition of the existing entry and first bay.  In order to accommodate the demolition extents, strengthening specifications were provided.  RLG also provided specialty FRP design and inspection services during construction.  One interesting part of construction was the decision to temporarily leave a screenwall on the roof of the structure.  The load from the screenwall provided a load-balance to limit initial phase strengthening over the existing MRI room.  The MRI was planned to move to the new structure once the addition was complete and the hospital system wanted to limit any MRI rental/down time as much as possible.  By leaving the wall in-place until after the new tower was built, the MRI was only down for the period of time that was required to move it to its new space. Phase 2: Renovation of existing spaces.  As part of this phase, new mechanical units were placed on the roof and screened.  Additionally, a larger bulk oxygen tank was installed which required a new foundation. Phase 3: Core/Shell of the Tower Structure.  Interesting aspects of the tower include a seam of very hard rock that made pier drilling difficult.  Additionally, the new expansion placed building footprint over an existing tunnel that extends from the central plant to the hospital (bringing vital services).  The limited depth of the tunnel required a transition in the ground floor structural system to a shallower option.  The structure is a one-way slab and beam system throughout with a crawlspace. Phase 4: Build-out.  This phase was primarily medical equipment support and such.